Drug Topics Voices 05-10-2015

May 10, 2015

Letters, e-mails, comments, and posts by Drug Topics readers

Unacceptable

Re: “Race lesson in the pharmacy” [Cynthia Cooper, April 15, drugtopics.com]:

I am a practicing pharmacist today, and I’ve been in a leadership position for two major drugstore chains looking after 800+ pharmacists in those roles. I have never allowed any patient to racially abuse my team (or use any other type of harassment) no matter what the scenario!

I am not a legal expert, but racially abusing someone is an illegal offense, and anyone who condones that behavior is just as big a racist as the perpetrator.

I would like to publicly apologize to this pharmacist for what she has suffered. If more pharmacists acted to stamp out this behavior we might be taken seriously and not have to suffer this kind of treatment.

I have friends who are physicians, lawyers, real estate brokers, businessmen, nurses, and PAs. I put this scenario to them. Not one of them would allow this to happen to them. Think about what [our willingness to put up with such treatment] says about our level of professionalism.

Anonymous
posted at drugtopics.com

The pharmacist as masochist

This was always my issue with working in the retail/chain pharmacy setting: We are expected to just accept being bullied/heckled/harassed at work. I don’t know of any other professional who is expected to put up with this kind of behavior -and with a smile, at that! It is completely unacceptable behavior that I never tolerated when I worked in retail.

Anonymous

posted at drugtopics.com

And then comes management

Here is where the real crime begins: In the aftermath, the high school grad diplomats of the store probably felt compelled to reward this bad behavior with gift cards as compensation for the “inconvenience.” Then comes a Spanish Inquisition of store managers, district pharmacy managers, and five others up the corporate ladder who come around to ask/tell you about the situation as if you were not even part of it. The managers then proceed to advocate for the inappropriate customer and proceed to preach about what you coulda/shoulda done. All this is then documented in your HR file to be used against you later.

Anonymous

posted at drugtopics.com

Their bad attitude beats your reality

Our company recently adopted a zero tolerance policy for even perceived rudeness or maltreatment of a customer, so what are you going to do except erect your own pharmacy somewhere, where you’ll discover other equally trying trials and hazards. Knowledge is power, though, and now that you know what you’re dealing with, how will you proceed?

Anonymous

posted at drugtopics.com

Tell it to the judge

Re: “Most of pharmacist’s claims against Walmart dismissed” [Mark Lowery, April 15, drugtopics.com]:

I am assuming the judge is also an attorney. When was the last time he, or any attorneys he knows, did research to come up to speed to assist a client and did not charge for his research time?

Anonymous

posted at drugtopics.com

 

“Payroll neutral” or else

This judge obviously has never been ordered to attend employer-required “payroll-neutral” training on his day off or face termination. Does he buy and launder his robes out of his own pocket? I doubt it. Truck drivers and pilots are prohibited from working one minute past specific work intervals without enforced, mandatory rest periods. Willfully ignoring these safety precautions will result in serious accidents, consequences, or reprimands. How is it different for other “professionals”?

You can bet this Judge never once stood 12-14 hours on his feet without a designated break or meal time for a single day or week, much less 1-20 years, or he would be whistling a different tune.

Anonymous

posted at drugtopics.com

Only in pharmacy

Re: “Provider status is fine and dandy, but pharmacists need to get paid” [Jose Lopez, March 25, drugtopics.com]:

To my way of thinking, two points drive many of our professional woes.

First, unlike any other profession, we are inexorably tied to the product, what we “sell.” Did anyone every hear a lawyer say that he charges only three cents per contract page or a physician say that he will stitch you up for $2.70 per stitch?

Second, most students are taught such mantras as “We can save you money” or “This is a very expensive drug; I can give you something much cheaper.” Unless we bill for cognitive services, we will remain the only “product-reimbursed” profession.

Sal Giorgianni Jr., PharmD
posted at drugtopics.com

The new American way?

It is sheer comedy that we provide extensive counseling, immunizations, MTMs, advice for Medicare insurance sign-ups, etc., and don’t see an extra cent in our paychecks, yet middle management continues to scream about cutting hours and building volume. What a joke!

Anonymous

posted at drugtopics.com

Down tools

A large-scale walkout by retail pharmacists may be the only way to send a message. If Senator McCain can’t get his heart meds, tell him, “I’m sorry, we don’t have any pharmacists today, but you can order from Canada and expect delivery in three to five business days.”

Maybe that would also send a message to the large chains. Imagine what would happen to their profits and reputations if for one day not a single prescription in, say, one town, or one county, or one state could be dispensed. Since it seems that all they care about is their bottom line, hit ’em where it hurts.

Anonymous

posted at drugtopics.com

Stand up, speak out

If all or many would stand up, speak out, and/or get out, employers would have no choice but to change working conditions. It is likely to require temporary sacrifices from many pharmacists. Who’s willing? I’m in.

Larry LaBenne, PharmD
posted at drugtopics.com