Coalition targets abuse of ADHD meds

August 29, 2014

A new coalition has formed to help prevent the misuse, abuse, and diversion of medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly among college students.

A new coalition has formed to help prevent the misuse, abuse, and diversion of medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly among college students.

Coalition to Prevent ADHD Medication Misuse (CPAMM) members include the American Academy of Family Physicians, Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD), the Jed Foundation, NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, the BACCHUS Initiatives of NASPA, and Shire.

More U.S. adults relying on ADHD meds

CPAMM’s focus will be research and educational programs. It plans to study the perceptions and attitudes of college students regarding ADHD prescription stimulant misuse and abuse. That research will be used to design educational campaigns to prevent nonmedical use.

 

"Shire opposes the misuse, abuse, and diversion of ADHD prescription stimulant medication and is committed to being a part of a solution to help prevent nonmedical use while preserving access to these important medications for those with a legitimate medical need,” said Gwen Fisher, Shire’s senior director of corporate communications. “Shire recognizes that to create change we need collaborative solutions, which is why we've brought together this team of diverse and experienced experts and advocates."

Misuse of ADHD medications is prevalent at many colleges and universities. A 2013 study at one large public university found that 9.3% of college students admitted nonmedical use of prescription stimulant medications.

"The misuse, abuse, and diversion of prescription drugs is a concern of student affairs administrators across the country. Often, students who inappropriately use ADHD prescription medications don't realize the consequences it may have on their academic career and future livelihood,” said Kevin Kruger, PhD, president of NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education. “As an association that represents more than 14,000 professionals, it is imperative that we increase awareness of the serious impact of ADHD prescription misuse, abuse, and diversion."