Walgreens releases API program to developers for Rx refill technology

February 5, 2013

Refilling a prescription is getting easier. Walgreens’ new application programming interface (API) allows third-party mobile app developers with scanning functionality to incorporate the chain’s prescription refill technology. This integration enables app users to order a prescription refill by scanning the barcode on their Walgreens prescription bottle.

 

Refilling a prescription is getting easier. Walgreens’ new application programming interface (API) allows third-party mobile app developers with scanning functionality to incorporate the chain’s prescription refill technology. This integration enables app users to order a prescription refill by scanning the barcode on their Walgreens prescription bottle.

“People continue to become increasingly engaged with their mobile devices and use the technology to help make their day-to-day lives easier,” said Abhi Dhar, Walgreens e-commerce chief technology officer. “By incorporating the Walgreens Prescription API, mobile app developers are providing users with an easy way to refill prescriptions and help them properly take their medication.”

Several app developers have adopted Walgreens Prescription API, including Healthspek, a personal health record for iPad, and PocketPharmacist, a comprehensive pharmacy app for the iPad and iPhone.

“We are excited about our relationship with Walgreens,” said Randy Farr, president of Healthspek. “Walgreens leadership position in technology and consumer empowerment fits perfectly with Healthspek's message to consumers, ‘Own Your Chart!’ ”

“PocketPharmacist is thrilled to offer iOS users both the convenience and ease of refilling their Walgreens prescriptions,” said Michael Guren, founder and CEO of Danike, Inc. “We believe this adds to our goal of helping people better understand and manage their medications.”

In addition, the Walgreens app for iPhone features Refill by Scan, which accounts for 40% of the chain’s refill requests, according to Dhar.

Medication non-adherence costs the healthcare system an estimated $290 billion a year, according to the New England Healthcare Institute. This type of technology, along with face-to-face interaction and counseling, can help increase adherence rates.