Walgreens launches education program after 90-day med survey

February 22, 2011

"While most pharmacy chains allow patients to order 90-day supplies of medication for a reduced price, most patients do not realize that this option is available. "

While most pharmacy chains allow patients to order 90-day supplies of medication for a reduced price, most patients do not realize that this option is available.

A recent survey of 1,000 U.S. consumers made by Echo Research for Walgreens found that half of patients who use mail-order pharmacies believe that mail order is the only option for 90-day prescriptions. In addition, two-thirds of 30-day chronic medication users would be “extremely” or “very likely” to switch to 90-day supplies at their community pharmacies, if given the option. Walgreens, Wal-Mart, and most other major chains allow their customers to buy 90-day supplies of medications for a relatively low price, compared to buying 3 separate 30-day supplies of the same drug.  At Wal-Mart pharmacies, for example, the chain’s multitude of prescriptions that are available for $4 each for a 30-day supply are available for $10 each for a 90-day supply. The chain’s eligible brand-name and generic medications on the list include penicillin, tetracycline, and benzonatate.

“One way to improve medication adherence and compliance is by allowing patients to receive 90-day supplies of chronic medications at their community pharmacy. Today, some patients still are only able to receive a 90-day medication supply through a mail-order option designed by their prescription plan administrator,” said Greg Wasson, president and CEO of Walgreens. As a result, Walgreens is launching a “Go 90” education program, which will inform eligible patients that they can receive 90-day medication supplies from their community pharmacists. “We will also be encouraging all prescription plan administrators to adopt this design to help both their clients and individuals save money, while improving patient health through proper medication adherence and compliance,” Wasson said.