Study: Tobacco marketing increases teen smoking

May 14, 2007

A new study, published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, concludes that the more cigarette marketing teens are exposed to in retail stores, the more likely they are to smoke, and that restricting these retail marketing practices would reduce smoking among teens.

A new study, published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, concludes that the more cigarette marketing teens are exposed to in retail stores, the more likely they are to smoke, and that restricting these retail marketing practices would reduce smoking among teens. The new research demonstrates the need for Congress to enact pending legislation granting the FDA authority over tobacco products, including the authority to crack down on tobacco marketing that impacts children, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. The researchers used data collected from 1999 to 2003, examining the impact of several tobacco retail marketing strategies, including cigarette point-of-sale advertising, cigarette price, and other promotions such as multipack discounts and gifts with purchase. The study was conducted by Bridging the Gap, a joint project of the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Michigan. It was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and CDC.

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