Proposal: Regulate 26 synthetic drugs under Controlled Substances Act

June 19, 2012

U.S. Senate and House negotiations on the Food Safety and Innovation Act (S. 3187) have resulted in the proposal that 26 synthetic drugs be newly regulated under the Controlled Substances Act.

U.S. Senate and House negotiations on the Food Safety and Innovation Act (S. 3187) have resulted in the proposal that 26 synthetic drugs be newly regulated under the Controlled Substances Act.

While the 26 drugs include synthetic cannabanoids and “2C” (synthetic psychedelic/hallucinogens), they do not include some of the “bath salt” stimulants that are not already regulated by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

For example, methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), a key ingredient in the street drugs known as “bath salts,” is not currently included in the U.S. Controlled Substances Act. However, Canadian Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq said that the government will place MDPV on Schedule I of the country’s Controlled Drugs and Substances Act because of its dangerous use in street drugs.

Still, the DEA commended House and Senate negotiators for agreeing on legislation to include the 26 synthetics, including drugs found in “K2” and “Spice.” “Products labeled as ‘herbal incense’ have become especially popular, especially among teens and young adults. These products consist of plant material laced with synthetic cannabinoids which, when smoked, mimic the delirious effects of THC, the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana,” according to a DEA statement.

The Congressional negotiators recommended that nine different 2C chemicals (dimethoxyphenethylamines) and 15 synthetic cannabinoids be added to Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act.