Pfizer Announces US Launch of 3 New Oncology Biosimilars

January 23, 2020

Pfizer announced the introduction of 3 new oncology biosimilars to the US market at a substantially discounted price.

Pfizer announced the introduction of 3 new oncology biosimilars to the US market at a substantially discounted price, according to a company press release.

The 3 biosimilars, bevacizumab-bvzr (Zirabev),rituximab-pvvr (Ruxience), and trastuzumab-qyyp (Trazimera), are expected to launch at the lowest wholesale acquisition cost (WAC) among all bevacizumab, rituximab, or trastuzumab products currently on the market.

Pfizer’s bevacizumab-bvzr, which was launched on December 31, 2019 at a WAC of $61.34 per 10 mg, represents a 23% discount to the WAC of originator bevacizumab (Avastin). Bevacizumab-bvzr is currently indicated for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, recurrent glioblastoma, metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer.

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Pfizer introduced rituximab-pvvr to the market on January 23, 2020 at a WAC of $71.68 per 10 mg, representing a 24% discount to the WAC of rituximab (Rituxan). Rituximab-pvvr is indicated for the treatment of adults with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis.

Trastuzumab-qyyp, which is the only of the 3 products that has not yet been launched, will be made available on February 15, 2020 at a WAC of $80.74 per 10 mg. This represents a 22% discount to the WAC of trastuzumab (Herceptin), according to Pfizer. Trastuzumab-qyyp will be available for the use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpressing breast cancer and HER2 overexpressing metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

According to Pfizer, pass-through status is being pursued for each of the products. The pass-through payment program supports reimbursement and incentivizes access for Medicare patients for certain treatments.

“The introduction of 3 news biosimilars is significant, delivering additional treatment options for patients across 9 cancer types,” Mark Pegram, MD, associate director for clinical research at the Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and director of the Breast Oncology Program at the Stanford Women’s Cancer Center, said in a statement. “Biosimilars can play an important role in the care of people living with cancer, and I am encouraged by the possibility for improved access for providers to these medications which are highly similar to their reference product.”