Oregon pharmacists gain provider status

June 29, 2015

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has signed legislation that authorizes pharmacists in that state to be paid for clinical services and expands collaborative practice agreements.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has signed legislation that authorizes pharmacists in that state to be paid for clinical services and expands collaborative practice agreements.

HB 2028 also directs the Oregon Health Authority to work with the Oregon Board of Pharmacy to establish protocols for services such as smoking cessation and travel medicine.

Pharmacist provider status gains traction

“Pharmacists play an essential role in assuring access to quality, cost-effective care,” Cory Huot, chair of the Oregon State Pharmacy Coalition,” stated in a release. “Pharmacists are a critical part of the healthcare team, and have the education, the expertise, and now the opportunity, to make a difference in the health and wellness of all Oregonians.”

Oregon joins California and Washington as states that have already authorized pharmacists to be paid for various clinical services.

“This is a great step forward for the profession,” Gary DeLander, president of the Oregon State Pharmacy Association, told Pharmacy Today. “This is the culmination of more than four years of work with a variety of stakeholders, and we are very excited that Oregon pharmacists will now have the opportunity to more fully utilize their expertise to increase access to quality, cost-effective health care across the state.”

 

Thomas E. Menighan, BSPharm, MBA, ScD (Hon), FAPhA, executive vice president and CEO of the American Pharmacists Association, said APhA continues to push for national legislation authorizing provider status for all pharmacists.

“[The new law] means the specialized education and training that pharmacists can bring to the health care team is being recognized, and Oregon pharmacists will be able to use their skills to improve health outcomes for more patients,” Menighan wrote on his blog. “As exciting things happen at the state level, APhA continues to push for provider status legislation at the federal level.”