New law designed to eradicate deadly staph infection

August 22, 2007

A new law signed by Gov. Jon Corzine earlier this month requires all hospitals in the Garden State to test patients in ICUs for methicillin-resistant S. aureus.

New Jersey is taking steps to eradicate potentially deadly staph infections in its hospitals. A new law signed by Gov. Jon Corzine earlier this month requires all hospitals in the Garden State to test patients in ICUs for methicillin-resistant S. aureus, a bacteria known as MRSA that can be contracted during a hospital stay and spread by patients who show no symptoms of illness. CDC statistics indicate that hospital-acquired staph infections are on the rise nationwide. In 1974, MRSA cases accounted for 2% of the total number of staph infections at hospitals; in 2004, the disease accounted for 63%. Under the new law, New Jersey hospitals must now test patients for MRSA when they are admitted and discharged. All cases must be reported to the N.J. Department of Health & Senior Services.

To see more Hot off the Press news articles, click here.

To go to the Drug Topics homepage, click here.