Did pharmacy fleece 9/11 responders?

September 26, 2014

A New York legislator said he plans to introduce a bill aimed at preventing an Upper East Side pharmacy from charging 9/11 responders $150 to obtain printouts of their records.

A New York legislator said he plans to introduce a bill aimed at preventing an Upper East Side pharmacy from charging 9/11 responders $150 to obtain printouts of their records.

According to a story in the New York Post, many police officers, construction workers, and others with 9/11-related medical claims are treated at Mount Sinai Hospital. Because of its proximity to the hospital, many of those patients fill their prescriptions at the nearby Madison Avenue Pharmacy.

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The Post reported that the pharmacy was charging exorbitant fees to patients attempting to get printouts of their medications so they could file claims with the federal September 11th Victim Compensation Fund.

Joseph Castiglia, 62, a 9/11 crane operator who takes drugs for brain and kidney cancer, was told he needed pay $150 to have his two-page record printed and given to him. “It’s a shakedown,” Castiglia told the newspaper.

 

His lawyer said CVS and other pharmacies print out the information at no charge.

New York has a law that requires healthcare facilities to provide medical records at minimal costs, but that law does not include pharmacies. Assemblyman Richard Gottfried said he would introduce a bill that would amend the law and also require pharmacies to provide medical records at minimal costs.

The pharmacy subsequently announced that it would process 9/11 claims free of charge.