Coronavirus News Roundup: FDA Issues EUA for Rapid Antigen Test, ASHP Releases COVID-19 Vaccine Guidelines

August 28, 2020

Here's the coronavirus-related news from this week that you should know.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has infected an estimated 24,495,232 individuals worldwide, and approximately 5.9 million Americans. The latest COVID-19 related news includes the FDA issuing Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for Abbott’s BinaxNOW COVID-19 Ag Card antigen test, ASHP providing principles for the development and distribution of a future vaccine, and a study demonstrating a link between individuals with metabolic syndrome and COVID-19 deaths.

Here’s a roundup of the latest coronavirus-related news:

FDA Issues Emergency Use Authorization to New 15-Minute COVID-19 Antigen Test

Abbott’s BinaxNOW COVID-19 Ag Card rapid test produces results in 15 minutes.

Officials with the FDA have issued an EUA for Abbott’s BinaxNOW COVID-19 Ag Card rapid test for the detection of COVID-19, according to a press release.

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ASHP Outlines Tenets for COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout and Oversight

ASHP issued its recommended principles for the development, distribution, allocation, and oversight of an eventual COVID-19 vaccine.

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Will Drive-Up Flu Vaccinations Be Prevalent This Fall?

As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded, national pharmacy chains and some independents quickly stepped in and offered to be testing sites for the coronavirus. At many CVS and Walgreens stores, for example, individuals can drive up and receive a COVID-19 swab test.

Now, drug stores are parlaying that same philosophy into making influenza vaccinations more convenient and safe during the pandemic.

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Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Increased Risk of COVID-19 Mortality

Individuals with metabolic syndrome who were hospitalized for COVID-19 were more likely to experience worse outcomes.

Patients with a combination of high blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes who are hospitalized with COVID-19 may be more likely to die from the disease, according to a new study.

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