California hospitals improve MRSA, CLABSI rates

August 30, 2012

California hospitals are doing a better job of controlling methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and central-line associated bloodstream infections, according to a new report.

California hospitals are doing a better job of controlling methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and central-line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), according to a new report.

The California Department of Health found that the frequency of CLABSIs in California was 36% lower in 2010 than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s U.S. baseline data from 2006 through 2008. “This 36% reduction is modestly better than the 32% reduction nationwide and indicates that…California hospitals appear to be at least on pace with the United States as a whole,” the report stated.

In addition, the number of CLABSIs reported in California was 10% lower at 3,163 cases in the state than in 2010. The California CLABSI rate was 8% lower on average in 2011 in neonatal critical-care areas, and 15% lower in general-care areas.

Meanwhile, the Department of Health found that MRSA rates dropped or stayed the same among community hospitals, major teaching hospitals, and pediatric hospitals, but increased at four long-term acute-care hospitals (LTAC). Pediatric hospitals had the lowest MRSA BSI rate at .07 per 10,000 patient days.

The average MRSA BSI rate among 22 LTAC hospitals was 1.64 per 10,000 patient days, the highest average rate among all hospital categories, and higher than the 1.08 rate during the previous reporting period.