Allergic rhinitis patients not satisfied with current treatments

May 24, 2011

Allergic rhinitis patients are likely to have sleep disturbances and are not likely to be satisfied with the nasal sprays on the market, according to the new Nasal Allergy Survey Assessing Limitations 2010 study.

Allergic rhinitis patients are likely to have sleep disturbances and are not likely to be satisfied with the nasal sprays on the market, according to the new Nasal Allergy Survey Assessing Limitations (NASL) 2010 study.

The results from NASL, conducted by Teva Respiratory in Horsham, Penn., were presented at the recent American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) Annual Meeting in San Francisco. According to one major finding, the fatigue that nasal allergy patients are experiencing may be related to sleep disruption caused by common symptoms associated with allergic rhinitis, such as post-nasal drip, repeated sneezing, nasal congestion, and headache, which are usually worse during April and May.

“The negative impact that allergic rhinitis symptoms can have on a patient’s quality of sleep is considerable, as it not only affects them physically, but also emotionally. As allergy season is upon us, it is important for patients suffering from allergic rhinitis symptoms like post-nasal drip to understand how these symptoms can negatively affect their quality of life,” said Gary Gross, MD, FAAAAI, with the Dallas Allergy & Asthma Center.

In other findings, less than 20% of the 400 patients surveyed felt that their nasal allergy symptoms were completely controlled. NASL’s corresponding study of 250 healthcare practitioners found that the only intranasal corticosteroids available for the treatment of allergic rhinitis are products with a “wet” spray.

Patients said they were less satisfied with current nasal sprays when they experienced discomfort from the spray or when they felt the medication drip down the back of their throats, and many healthcare providers are not satisfied with the sprays due to the “bothersome side effects associated with these treatments,” according to a statement by Teva Respiratory.

“These results reinforce the need for alternative treatments to help alleviate these symptoms and overall disease burden of allergic rhinitis,” Gross said.