Air travelers can carry on these HBCs

January 8, 2007

The Transportation Security Administration's recently revised ban on certain health and beauty care and over-the-counter items has baffled, frustrated, and inconvenienced many air travelers. But not Jodi Nass.

The Transportation Security Administration's recently revised ban on certain health and beauty care and over-the-counter items has baffled, frustrated, and inconvenienced many air travelers. But not Jodi Nass.

Fly Dry's products are different from the travel-sized products stocked in many pharmacies because most of them are hand-made and organic. Nass was enthusiastic as she described some of the unique items from her collection. "The shampoos I sell are in the form of a soap bar. My lotion bars have different scents. The moisturizing bar emulsifies by the warmth of your hands. The Smart Fixx H2 Styling Strips for men turn into a gel with a splash of water," she said.

There is also a solid deodorant called Thai Crystal Deodorant Stone that is hypoallergenic, unscented, and nonstaining. Finally, Fly Dry offers a shaving bar that turns into shaving cream when wet.

In addition to selling items separately, Nass has created The Men's Fly Dry Travel Kit and The Women's Fly Dry Travel Kit. The men's kit includes a deodorant, shampoo bar, shaving bar, shaving brush, safety razor, tooth powder and toothbrush, lip balm, and lotion bar. The Women's Fly Dry Travel Kit contains deodorant, shampoo bar, hair-conditioning bar, emery board, tooth powder, toothbrush, lip balm, and lotion bar.

The items are sold in a clear plastic carrying case that can easily pass airline security. Each kit costs $49.

Nass is also selling several brand-name products such as Crest, Colgate, and AquaFresh toothpaste, Frizz Ease, Old Spice deodorant, Edge shaving gel, and Nivea moisturizing crème in containers that weigh less than three ounces.

Nass has teamed up with a Texas soap manufacturer to offer natural soaps that contain aromatherapy scents such as eucalyptus, tea tree, and lemongrass.

Boasting that she is doing a brisk on-line business, especially for corporate gifts, Nass said that her products are available at Vitomers Pharmacy and F. Feldman's, a housewares store. Both are on Madison Avenue in New York City.

What happens if the carry-on ban is lifted? Nass believes her products have strong appeal for business travelers. "When people travel, having an item spill is a big problem because the liquid or gel can ruin clothing. If you have to carry on, you need small and light items, because a lot of the airlines are charging for excess luggage. You have to be very compact," she said.

Meanwhile, Nass has applied to sell her products at an airport kiosk. She is also in discussion with Virgin Atlantic airlines to sell her products in its in-flight magazine. She is considering partnering with a Los Angeles firm to include her products in gift baskets that are given to stars at award shows.

What products will Nass add to her menu?

Nass is considering lipsticks on a piece of paper, private-label mint candies that turn into mouthwash, a small-size contact lens solution, and mascara in a cake formulation.

"I'm thinking out of the box, and I am putting together line extensions. If the regulations change, I don't mind being a company that specializes in products for travelers," said Nass.

For more information, visit http://www.flydry.net/.