150 Years of American Pharmacy: Fallout of National Formulary of Unofficial Preparations

June 18, 2007

The publication of the National Formulary of Unofficinal Preparations along with the U.S. Pharmacopeia was essential to the transition to a new industrial age. Still, as pharmacists quickly learned, it also opened up the secret science of pharmacy to a new level of competition.

The publication of the National Formulary of Unofficinal Preparations along with the U.S. Pharmacopeia was essential to the transition to a new industrial age. Still, as pharmacists quickly learned, it also opened up the secret science of pharmacy to a new level of competition.

The passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, however, drew extra attention to the pharmacist's compendium. "Manufacturers are alive and-to use a vulgar but very expressive word-hustling, while the druggist is indulging in day dreams," Druggists' Circular warned.

Along with USP, the National Formulary was a key step in pharmacy's transition to industrialization. However, as Druggists' Circular foresaw, the publications also made it easier for drug manufacturers to send samples of their products to physicians "calling them by fancy and easy names," which took away a key business from traditional pharmacies.