12-year-old arrested in Indiana pharmacy robbery

September 30, 2015

In perhaps what is a disturbing sign of the times, a 12-year-old was recently arrested for attempting to rob a Walgreens in Indianapolis, according to a report in the Indianapolis Star.

In perhaps what is a disturbing sign of the times, a 12-year-old was recently arrested for attempting to rob a Walgreens in Indianapolis, according to a report in the Indianapolis Star.

Editor's Choice: Why so many pharmacy robberies in Indiana?

According to the newspaper, the preteen attempted to rob the Walgreens at 5199 N. Keystone Ave in Indianapolis. Police responded to a robbery in progress call and apprehended the suspect.

No weapon was discovered, and the boy was taken to a juvenile detention center. The report did not indicate how the boy relayed his robbery demand.

During the 24-hour period in which the above-mentioned robbery attempt occurred, the newspaper reported there were at least seven robberies or attempted robberies of pharmacies in the Indianapolis area involving juveniles.

One of the robberies involved a 16-year-old who allegedly used a firearm to rob a Walgreens pharmacy. In yet another case, police said a teenager passed a note to a CVS pharmacy technician demanding drugs and money. However, police said that teen left without taking anything.

According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, Indiana leads the nation in pharmacy robberies (Hot Read: Top 20 states for pharmacy robberies).  

During the first five months of 2015, the 68 pharmacy robberies in Indiana were twice as many as California (31) and more than five times as many as Texas (12).

 

One lieutenant with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department previously told Drug Topics that juveniles recruited by adults commit most of the pharmacy robberies. He said the juveniles are used because current law does not punish them harshly enough to be a deterrent.

“These guys have found out that it is relatively easy,” said Lt. Craig McCartt. “And word has spread. As soon as we arrest one, there are two to take their place.”

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