Paperless Rx labeling trial on track

November 8, 2004
Carol Ukens

Carol Ukens, a former editor at <i>Drug Topics</i>, is a freelance writer based in New Jersey

A 90-day field test of paperless labeling solutions is under way at 126 pharmacy sites. One tester, Thomson PDR, has improved its PDR On-Demand appliance, which consists of a small, bar-code-enabled, touch screen kiosk that is up dated daily with the latest product information. Etreby Computer Corp. has opted for a Web-based solution in the race to win PhRMA's backing for the paperless label system to reduce those pesky paper patient inserts. Regardless of which firm comes out ahead, the technology is not supposed to cost pharmacies.

A 90-day field test of paperless labeling solutions is under way at 126 pharmacy sites. One tester, Thomson PDR, has improved its PDR On-Demand appliance, which consists of a small, bar-code-enabled, touch screen kiosk that is up dated daily with the latest product information. Etreby Computer Corp. has opted for a Web-based solution in the race to win PhRMA's backing for the paperless label system to reduce those pesky paper patient inserts. Regardless of which firm comes out ahead, the technology is not supposed to cost pharmacies.

Total recall When Merck recently recalled Vioxx (rofecoxib), the Familymeds chain was able to call thousands of patients using Silverlink's interactive voice technology. With 80 professional pharmacies in 14 states, Familymeds was able to give patients the option of having the pharmacy call their physician to discuss discontinuing the drug and possible alternative treatments. Silverlink is at http://www.silverlink.com/.

Flu blues The British shutdown of Chiron's influenza vaccine facility threw the U.S. immunization scene into a real tizzy. To get the latest word about the new CDC interim guidelines on who should get the vaccine, go to http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/ and http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5339a6.htm/.

Sensor-ship University of Canterbury, New Zealand, engineers and medical experts are developing a computer program and device that can sense when a patient is in pain and measure out the precise dose of drug needed. If the device makes it into the commercial mainstream-perhaps in five years-it could save hospitals billions in wasted drugs. The most likely scenario is that the device would calculate the measurements and then ask a nurse for permission to administer the drug, according to the Kiwi researchers.

Editing job NDCHealth announced its newest pre- and postediting services package for the community pharmacy market. PPE+ for Community Rx is a combination of financial, patient wellness, and clinical editing services to boost claim reimbursements. Edits include AWP substitution; a function to identify usual-and-customary claims and identify discontinued or replaced drugs; and the Rx safety function, which searches and identifies look-alike and sound-alike drug pairs. There's also access to reports and AWP resubmission services. For more information, phone 1-(800) 778-6711 or visit http://www.ndchealth.com/.

Perfect host QS/1 Data Systems unveiled a new application service provider solution, NRx onDemand. Using a Windows graphical user interface, the service allows pharmacies to capture scanned Rxs, signatures, and pill images to store with the patient's records. It's also hosted in multiple QS/1 data centers to ensure patient data won't be lost in the event of a power failure or tech meltdown. The Spartanburg, S.C., technology firm also handles all the systems and software maintenance, monitoring, and management. The Web site is at http://www.qs1.com/.

Related Content:

Technology