New options for migraine relief

August 21, 2006

More than 28 million Americans suffer from migraine headaches, often beginning during adolescence, continuing throughout adulthood, and affecting three times as many women as men. The prescription drug market for the treatment of migraines is about $2 billion annually in this country. Vying for a piece of the pie are several new companies-some utilizing new combinations or new formulations of old drugs and a few developing new drug entities. Here's a heads-up on what's coming our way.

More than 28 million Americans suffer from migraine headaches, often beginning during adolescence, continuing throughout adulthood, and affecting three times as many women as men. The prescription drug market for the treatment of migraines is about $2 billion annually in this country. Vying for a piece of the pie are several new companies-some utilizing new combinations or new formulations of old drugs and a few developing new drug entities. Here's a heads-up on what's coming our way.

In a phase II trial of 126 migraine-sufferers, among patients receiving the minimum effective dose of intravenous olcegepant (2.5 mg), 66% responded to treatment compared with 27% receiving placebo. The drug was generally well tolerated, according to the manufacturer. The most common side effect observed was paresthesias.

Trexima contains 85 mg of sumatriptan succinate and 500 mg naproxen sodium in a single tablet and, according to the manufacturers, is the first product to treat both the inflammation and vasodilation associated with migraine headaches.